Sunday, May 11, 2008

Someone's Mother-In-Law's Steamed Chocolate Cake

Posted by Quinn at Sunday, May 11, 2008


That one was a very traditional hand-me-down moist chocolate cake recipe that I found here. I'm gonna retype it here again with substitutions I've made. I always have this thing about hand-me-down recipe. Things with name like Grandma's apple crumble, Mum's secret mango pudding and my mother-in-law steamed chocolate cake can't go wrong. Often, they're a no-fail recipe.

I didn't have all ingredients in hand. After many substitutions and decorating while it's still hot (never ever be impatient with chocolate cake!), this look so modernized and definitely has no olden days goodness in it.Also, the top crack crack because I tried to unmould it while it's still hot. Lesson learnt the hard way. Nevertheless, it's the taste that counts. This is one rich, very fudgy chocolate cake. This yield a large amount, say 2 x 8'' round cake? It doesn't really matter and you could make this in any pan you have, even a loaf pan really.


Alright, will improve on my piping skills. Sorry people, bad decorations and the chocolate topping definitely can't cover the huge crack at the center. Too bad!

Anyway, here comes the recipe!

Portion A
1 1/2 cup plain flour
1 cup high quality dark cocoa powder (I like mine real dark!)
1 cup granulated sugar
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda

1 cup canola oil
1 cup fat free milk [I don't have any evaporated milk in hand and I ran out of full cream milk :( ]
3 extra large eggs (beaten)
1 tsp pure vanilla extract
1 cup boiling water (Must be boiling. Whatever lumps you have will be stir to combination here)


1) Sift together Portion A and stir until well mixed.
2) Stir in the rest of the ingredient in the sequence given.
3) Make sure to stir well after addition of each ingredient. Each ingredient goes in all at one go.
4) Pour the very thin batter in a well greased and line pan.
5) Steam at medium-low heat for 45mins or until done.


For the chocolate fudge topping (I love this and will definitely use this more often in my other baking where toppings are needed!)

Portion B
2 tbsp cocoa powder
2 tbsp canola oil
2 tbsp granulated sugar
1/4 cup of fat free milk (That's what I have in hand, please use full cream milk if possible!)

150g chocolates of your liking (I used Belgian Milk Chocolates*)
50g butter


6) Mix together Portion B. Don' bother sifting the cocoa powder.
7) Melt chocolate and butter ala Bain-Marie.
8) Once all butter and chocolates incorporated, fold in the mixed Portion B.
9) Mix well until smooth and glossy.
10) Chill to room temperature before pouring over cake.


Decorate as you like. Do all the ganache topping and the decorations when the cake is cooled (preferaly chilled). There is no harm in leaving the cake in the fridge overnight but lots of damage done if you try to be impatient like me, :(


Here's a slice of a super rich, moist, fudgy, real dark chocolate cake for whoever who's reading this!


* I dunno bout you guys but I think chocolate cake should not be brown and should not be light brown. Chocolate cake should be real dark, like black in colour like. I used Belgian chocolate because I prefer that to bittersweet choc. However, I still get a dark topping because there's 2 tbsp packed cocoa powder in it. You really could use any chocolates you like. Just make sure, they have at least 60% - 70% of cocoa content in them. Now, that's what I call a real chocolate cake!

Also, as many blogs already mentioned, boiling a kettle of water and waiting to refill the steamer just in case it ran out of water is a pretty useful tip. So, do it!

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15 comments on "Someone's Mother-In-Law's Steamed Chocolate Cake"

Ellena on June 1, 2008 at 12:07 AM said...

Wow... this cake indeed look too sinful to be eaten... i love the design and texture of your new creation....veri Prof... :) I shall give it a try when i am free because Reyon loves chocolate cake. :p

Quinn on June 1, 2008 at 10:38 AM said...

Haha, it's not as filling as it looks actually but the taste was pretty good. I cut down the sugar already and the cake by itself is not to sweet if you're planning on omitting the chocolate topping

ammorphic on April 3, 2009 at 2:18 PM said...

wow! your cake looks so stunning!Really delicious thats make my mouth water dripping..Btw, instead of using conola oil, what else i can use?

ammorphic on April 3, 2009 at 2:19 PM said...

wow! your cake looks so stunning!Really delicious thats make my mouth water dripping..Btw, instead of using conola oil, what else i can use?

Quinn on April 4, 2009 at 12:24 AM said...

Hey Ammorphic,

I've tried this with sunflower oil, margarine and melted butter too and it all worked well. Apart from the fact that if you wanna make this using melted butter, either place it covered in room temperature or warmed it back in the microwave(I personally dislike this a lot. The thought of microwaving my cakes, ewwww!). Margarine is alright too. Olive oil is a big no-no. Use mild oil like corn oil and vegetable oil. Hope this helps a bit. Happy trying!

ammorphic on April 8, 2009 at 12:21 AM said...

Hi quinn,
Have u try your recipe to a small cake like a cup cake?

Quinn on April 8, 2009 at 9:33 AM said...

Hi Ammorphic,

Just to clarify that this is not my recipe but I have linked the recipe from it's original blog. Just in case you miss it on my blog post on top, the link is here again from someone's mother-in-law:

http://recipesforkeeps.blogspot.com/2007/02/my-mother-in-laws-steamed-chocolate.html

I have not tried making this into cupcake however I found something interesting from the same blogger here:

http://recipesforkeeps.blogspot.com/2008/03/steamed-chocolate-cupcakes.html


Apparently, I think she did not notice that both recipe are the same and she had made it into cupcakes. She also claimed that she accidentally underbaked them and they came out awesome, like some sort of molten chocolate lava cake.

It is cooked as the batter has been poured with a cup of boiling water before baking. So no worries of salmonella infection if that's what you are worrying :)

However if you want this to be thoroughly cooked, I would suggest 30mins on medium-high heat. This cake batter is very watery.

Hope this helps.

Keryn said...

Hello, i've just learned to bake and i'd really love to try the recipe you shares. Btw, don't mind me asking you a few questions? What tin you use to bake the cake? I use normal round cake tin from phoon huat and the cake i bake always stick in the tin. What is springform pan? Hope you'd answer these .Thanks (:

Quinn on April 10, 2009 at 10:37 AM said...

Dear Keryn,

I really hope you enjoy baking and whipping up good comfort food as much as I do. It helps me a lot in releasing my stress but baking could really test your patience sometimes when things don't turn out well.

I have a lot of baking pans and some are springform, some are not. I use springform when I'm making cheesecakes, delicate tortes, flourless cakes and flans. These are some examples where you can't turn them out.

Springform pans are those with latch on the side which releases the sides from the bottom base. Sometimes the base is just plain and sometimes the base is just sorta like perforated. You could see what I mean here:

http://www.college-cram.com/study/pecosjack/files/13/68/springform+pan.JPG

http://www.smalltownkitchen.com/images/La_Forme_Springform_Pan_with_1_Base_Leakproof_9-inch.jpg

I have springform pans from 8inch onwards up to 12inch. Some sellers might tell you their springform pans are leakproof but in reality they are not. You just need to cling wrapped and foiled the outer side of the pan when you are making very watery cakes or when recipe calls from cheesecake/caramel flans being steambake or waterbath. That's the bad side about springform.

However, it's good to own one for the professional look cakes and tortes. Sometimes, I use my largest pizza pan base as my pizza tray. It's 30cm in diameter and makes a pretty good pizza tray.

That's my two cents about what I do and what I know about springform pans.

Finally, a very important point to remember is to grease the inner sides and base of your pan with butter. Line it with perfectly fitted baking paper as an insurance for easy removal. Even when your pans say non-stick, just lightly butter and line them.

My personal tip, when a recipe calls for a whole bar of butter, plop that nto the mixing bowl and use the butter wrapper to grease your pan.

If recipe calls for 1/2 bar of butter, just measure it out and grease your baking pan with that piece of butter before plopping it into your mixing bowl to mix with other ingredients.

Really hope this helps to you and some others who emailed and ask me about springform pans too.

Happy Baking!

Keryn said...

Dear,

Thanks you so much. You're really kind to answer them. Appreciate it(: Anyway, What brand of butter you usually use to bake cake?

Quinn on April 10, 2009 at 10:09 PM said...

Hi Keryn,

No worries and glad I could help.
I'm currently in Australia and I'm afraid the butter brand might be different. In Malaysia, brands like SCS and Golden Churn; they are really good. In Australia, we have the cheapest Black & Gold and also the good Devondale. Devondale is my common preference.

Keryn said...

Dear Quinn,

Thank you so much(: Did you used springform pan to bake the steam moist chocolate cake? or just normal cake tin? I really had a hard time removing the cake from its tin after i bake it.

Quinn on April 11, 2009 at 11:59 AM said...

Hi Keryn,

Nope, I've used a 9 inch round silicone pan to bake this as it was very watery. And I steamed the cake, not baked them. This way of steaming cakes results in a very moist cake.

Just remember to grease and line the pan well. Shouldn't be a problem really. For me, I have the luxury of using coking spray for all my bakes so I get a very even coating of grease before lining them.

Try again and you'll succeed over time.

Good luck!

Quinn on April 11, 2009 at 11:59 AM said...

Hi Keryn,

Nope, I've used a 9 inch round silicone pan to bake this as it was very watery. And I steamed the cake, not baked them. This way of steaming cakes results in a very moist cake.

Just remember to grease and line the pan well. Shouldn't be a problem really. For me, I have the luxury of using coking spray for all my bakes so I get a very even coating of grease before lining them.

Try again and you'll succeed over time.

Good luck!

Anonymous said...

hey quinn i have the same problem with keryn. i wonder how to transfer the cheese cake out from the springform pan??? i press the biscuit base to the pan then pour in the cheese mixture and put it to chilled and the next day i really don know how to take it out. I got 2 springform pan. like 1 is plain and 1 the base is just sort of like perforated. What is the difference? Which type is better?
Your help would be appreciated. Thankyou quinn =)

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